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Sponsored by the Jura Distillery
The Isle of Jura Fell Race
28 km. – 7 mountain summits (including the Paps of Jura)
2370 m. of climbing.
Craighouse, Isle of Jura.
Date: Saturday 24 May 2014 10.30am start

Race Organisers: Graham Arthur & others behind the scenes,
email: Graham

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CLICK FOR ISLE OF JURA DISTILLERY WEBSITE
30-40 Anniversary

Jura Fell Race Course:
1) Race Route Description (Starts at 10.30am)
Note changes to CLOSING TIMES for CP1 to CP4
 
POINT
ROUTE
GRID REF
REMARKS
ROUTE DETAILS/ CONDITIONS
Closing
Time
START
CRAIGHOUSE (Distillery)
527670
S end of village Proceed through gate opposite village hall  
Dubh Chreag
501680
Rocky Proceed on to Dubh Bheinn
CP1
DUBH BHEINN
489682
Rocky Moderate ascent to summit
11:40
CP2
GLAS BHEINN
500699
  Lochans on way to Glas Bheinn
12:10
CP3
AONACH BHEINN
483704
  Straightforward ridge traverse
12:25
Abhainn Gleann Astaile /Cross river to E of lochan Boggy area around river
CP4
BHEINN A’CHAOLAIS
488734
  Ascent through steep scree for 2,000 feet
13:25
Na garbh Lochanan
495740
Loch water below bealach Steep descent on scree and grass
CP5
BEINN AN OIR
498749
  Steep ascent on scree slope or ridge
14:30
Imir an Aonaich
507748
  Steep descent on rock and grass
CP6
BEINN SHIANTAIDH
513747
  Steep ascent by gully or ridge
15:35
Lochanan Tana
523750
  Direct descent to lochans impossible due to crags on NE flank of Beinn Shiantaidh. Descend SE on scree then NE on rough track and heather
CP7
CORRA BHEINN
526755
  Steep ascent mainly on rock and grass.
16:40
CP8
THREE ARCH BRIDGE
544720
On roadway Bogs or deer tracks to bridge. Glen Batrick path possibly easier (but slower)
17:30
FINISH
CRAIGHOUSE (Distillery)
527670
Last 3 miles on road Idyllic tarmac coast road from Bridge.
 
 

ROUTE MAP

2) Race Route Map
Many thanks to Chris Upson who has produced a useful course map on the Scottish Hill Racing website.

There's a copy of Chris's map here: click on the small map to the right and the big version will open in a new window.

N.B. Chris's marked route is not definitive. Plus, unless the visibility is really good, you might regret not taking a higher resolution printout with your own markings. + the bad weather alternative is even harder to navigate, it is said.


3) Description of Terrain

The mountain terrain crossed by the race is potentially dangerous.
It is imperative that you take the utmost care when on the Paps. Carelessness could directly or indirectly cause injury to others. Prior knowledge of the course (particularly with regard to ascent and descent of the Paps) is strongly advised.

Please note checkpoint closing times which are strictly applied.

Craighouse to Dubh Bheinn:
Proceed from the Distillery through the gate opposite the Village Hall and continue on up the road to the top near the telephone exchange. Leave the road at this point to break off through a deer-fence gate on to open moorland, keeping to the right of the intervening plantation. Though the gradient is fairly moderate, the ground itself is somewhat rough with innumerable rocky outcrops and is very boggy. Once over Dubh Chreag head for CP1 at Dubh Bheinn, a complex summit in the mist.

Dubh Bheinn to Glas Bheinn:
Retrace your steps slightly and move round the ridge passing some lochans and on up to the summit of Glas Bheinn; a moderate but stony ascent.

Glas Bheinn to Aonach Bheinn:
Ridge traverse to the west summit of Aonach Bheinn.

Aonach Bheinn to Beinn a’Chaolais:
Beinn ChaolaisModerate descent from Aonach Bheinn into Gleann Astaile; wet near the river. Choose your own route up the 2,000 feet to the summit of Beinn a’Chaolais. Good visibility reveals useful tongues and ramps of vegetation through otherwise sheer scree.

Beinn a’Chaolais to Beinn an Oir:
Steep descent on loose scree of large, sharp boulders (some grass) to saddle, then steep ascent up ridge to summit of Beinn an Oir. TAKE CARE ON SCREE – Beinn a’Chaolais is a convex mountain and the direct bearing would take you over crags.

Beinn an Oir to Beinn Shiantaidh:
DESCENDING OVER ROUGH SCREESEastern side of Beinn an Oir, although steep, is not as treacherous. Best descent is from low ruins at the end of an unusual boulder-track NE of summit cairn. Spring in hillside about 200 feet down. The ascent of Beinn Shiantaidh from the pass (Imir an Aonaich) is steep but on sure ground; take natural gully or right-hand ridge; ascent eases off before the summit.

Beinn Shiantaidh to Corra Bheinn:
Beinn Shiantaidh is another convex mountain. Descent of N side is very dangerous – sheer drop a short way below the summit. Best way is to descend SE flank for a few hundred feet on mainly small screes, then bear NE on screes and a rough trod for Lochanan Tana. From here, steep ascent on sure ground to summit of Corra Bheinn.

Corra Bheinn to Three Arch Bridge:
Straightforward descent to Bridge over deer tracks and rough grassland, very wet in places. Most runners cross the Corran River and follow tracks on the S side to the Bridge. Pass under the bridge.

Three Arch Bridge to Craighouse:
The rest of the way lies along a 3.3 mile stretch of road which hugs Jura’s beautiful coastline. (The milepost which says Craighouse 1 mile should not be taken too seriously).

 

Pronunciation Guide by George Broderick
George is the race founder and is a teacher of Gaelic Studies and here's what he has to say about pronunciation:
"I noticed that there was some difficulty among runners with the pronunciation of the hill-names on the course. If I may, I would like to supply them now along with an English-based pronunciation which may be felt to be helpful to the runners. Parts in bold type indicate where the stress lies. "

Dubh-Bheinn doo-venn 'black mountain'.
Glas-bheinn glass-venn 'grey/green mountain'.
Aonach-bheinn urnach-venn 'steep mountain'.
Beinn a' Chaolais bennya-khurlish 'mountain of/by/nearest the sound (i.e. Sound of Islay)'.
Beinn an Òir bennyan Oar 'mountain of the gold, the golden mountain' (seemingly from its golden hue, as seen at sunsets from the west, e.g. from Colonsay).
Beinn Shiantaidh benn heeantee 'holy mountain' (reason unknown).
Corra-bheinn korra-venn 'steep mountain'.

COURSE PROFILE


PAPS OF JURA